Sarah Arnold

Keeping skaters sharp

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn

Keeping skaters sharp

Sarah Arnold, Grad ’14, brings passion for figure skating to work.

Growing up on a pond in Milwaukee, Arnold enjoyed spending time on the ice. At age 11 she aspired to skate competitively and fulfilled that dream by competing on a synchronized skating team as a student at Miami University of Ohio. “Figure skating definitely takes every ounce of muscle and coordination, between strength, endurance and flexibility,” she says.

Enjoyment of the physically taxing life of an athlete is far from the only opportunity Arnold found to stay involved with skating.

She earned a master’s degree in leadership studies with a focus on sports leadership at Marquette. In addition to her studies, she gained good experience working for Marquette’s Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and interning at the Pettit National Ice Center in West Allis, Wis.

All of that helped Arnold start her dream career as athlete development manager with U.S. Figure Skating. She coordinates camps for young skaters that teach skating skills — from endurance to jumps and spins — to make sure the skaters have the best possible experience. “I’m really in charge of the logistics of prepping our younger athletes,” she says. She also works to keep the conversations alive online. “My role is to oversee our social media platforms for our U.S. Figure Skating DREAM mentorship program.”

Though synchronized skating won’t be a part of the 2018 Olympic Winter Games, Arnold and her colleagues are pushing for the 2022 Games. In the meantime, their skaters hope to compete at the World Championships. Arnold’s advice to young athletes is simple: “Don’t be afraid to explore lots of options.” — Megan Knowles, student-intern

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn

No one has commented on this yet.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

three × 4 =